LCI addresses UNESCO

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Image by Jane Hoffer

There is great excitement at Lincoln Center Institute these days, in anticipation of two major events in May. For the first time in the Institute’s history, it will present a professional development seminar in Seoul, Korea, May 21–25, hosted in alliance with Seoul Foundation for Arts and Culture (SFAC). While there, we will have the honor of yet another first for us: the Seoul Educators Workshop 2010 is the pre-event of the second UNESCO World Conference on Arts Education, hosted by Korea, and our Executive Director (and Imagination Now featured blogger), Scott Noppe-Brandon, has been invited to speak before an assembly of world’s cultural leaders. The UNESCO conference will look at the role of the arts both in and outside of the environment, and will hear diverse ideas about the future of arts education.

In his speech, Scott will address the international significance of LCI’s collaboration with SFAC, the invaluable relationship of LCI’s teaching artists with classroom teachers, and, of course, the importance of imagination—no longer the province of the arts alone, but the basis of the imagination-creativity-innovation paradigm that today fuels the progress of our society. And that means a changed education, fulfilling careers, and new visions of the world ahead.

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Notes from an Imagination Advocate, Part Two

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Image by Jane Hoffer

It’s always pleasing for an author who has written about an idea to see that idea reappear spontaneously in public discussions. I’ve experienced this pleasure with the “ICI Continuum,” a concept that Eric Liu and I include in Imagination First and that refers to this relationship: “Imagination -> Creativity (imagination applied) -> Innovation (novel creativity)” (20). In other words, imagination is conceiving of what is not, creativity is doing something with that conception, and innovation is advancing the form in question. Seems commonsensical, right? People are starting to think so, happily, but there hasn’t always been robust agreement on these issues. Continue reading